9 Holiday Decorating Mistakes You Don’t Want To Repeat This Year

9 Holiday Decorating Mistakes You Don’t Want To Repeat This Year

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas – the shopping malls are packed, the carols are playing, the streets are lit, and the neighbors’ homes are beautifully adorned with ornaments and lights. Have you already decorated your own home?

9 Holiday Decorating Mistakes You Don’t Want To Repeat This Year
9 Holiday Decorating Mistakes You Don’t Want To Repeat This Year

If you have not yet started decorating your home, you might want to check out these 9 holiday decorating mistakes which often lead to sloppy, cheap-looking décor, burned wallets, and burned homes. Chances are, you’ve done some of these things in the past and you don’t want to repeat them this year!

  1. It’s ALWAYS about red and green

We get it – orange and black for the Halloween, and white, red, and pink for Valentine’s Day. And when Christmas is around the corner, the world sparkles with vibrant red and green hues. But just because these are the celebrated go-to Christmas scheme doesn’t mean you’ll go overboard.

If you’ve been decorating your home with red and green for the past years, maybe it’s time to skip them this holiday. Think blue and white for an icy, Frozen-esque Christmas, green and brown for a rustic-inspired Holiday, blush tones and pretty pastels for a feminine appeal, or go all-white. Don’t forget to accent it with metallics, like gold and silver.

  1. The placement of the Christmas tree is off

It’s safe to say that your Christmas tree should be the star of your room, so it should stand in a visible area. Do a little furniture arrangement to place it in a visible corner or against a focal wall. Also, be mindful of what’s around – keep it away from fireplaces, radiators, and space heaters.

  1. You only decorate the living room

It’s a must to invest a lot of energy in decorating your living room, but don’t forget the rest of your home. You can spread the Christmas cheer throughout your house by placing a seasonal candle in the bathroom, hanging garlands or wreaths in the kitchen, and bringing the festive vibe in the dining room with a new table runner.

  1. You overlook hidden hazards for kids

If your kid is at the age where they can grab everything in sight and put them in their mouth, it’s a must to “child-proof” your home. Avoid hanging ornaments from the lower tree branches. Trim any low-hanging branches to avoid eye pokes. Keep small parts, especially those with sharp metal hooks, out of reach. Hang the lights higher too so they can’t get tangled.

  1. You keep reusing your string lights

Just because your 5-year-old string lights are still functional doesn’t mean you can still use it this year. Before you dazzle everyone with a spectacular light show, make sure to run through a quick safety checklist.

  • Check them for cracked cords, exposed or frayed wires or ends or loose connections.
  • Another reason to ditch old strands of lights is they’re less likely to have fuses – new, modern light shave fused plugs, preventing sparks in case of a short circuit.
  • If bulbs have burned out, replace them right away.
  • Don’t use tacks, nails or screws to hang lights – use insulated hooks instead.
  • Keep an eye on extension cords as they sometimes overheat. Touch test the chord- if it’s hot, unplug it.
  • Don’t use indoor lights for outdoor use. Indoor lights often have thinner insulation, which could be damaged when exposed to elements outdoors.
  1. You leave the lights on all night

Next to not checking your lights, leaving your window candles and string lights on all night aren’t the best way to spread the joy of Christmas.

One, it’s a huge energy suck, causing your electricity bills to skyrocket. Two, nobody is awake to appreciate them. Three, the glare could be bothersome to close neighbors trying to sleep. Finally, it could cause a fire. Turn them on only when the darkness falls and turn them off before you sleep.

  1. Your decorating schedule is off

Last-minute decorating can be stressful, especially when you must shop for decorations in an overly crowded department store. Decorating too early, when neighbors haven’t even taken down all their Halloween decors, isn’t the best way to go either

Rule of thumb: Start decorating after Thanksgiving Day. Think about your decor throughout the year, make a decorating list, and start picking up ornaments before December for an organized, stress-free holiday display.

  1. Your decorations are just over the top

One life-sized Santa, ten mini Santa Claus figurines, ten snowmen, a giant Christmas tree with 100 ornaments, Christmas lights everywhere – if your home looks like a Christmas décor store, you know you’ve gone overboard.

Displaying every single holiday décor you have don’t make your home bursting with holiday cheer – it makes your home look cluttered and sloppy. Going over the top isn’t great for your wallet too.

Instead of displaying everything all at once, try to limit your holiday elements to three to four per room. Same goes with your outdoor decorations. This way, you can make essential holiday elements to really stand out without being overwhelming. Don’t overdo a Christmas theme too.

  1. You forget to bring “personality”

It’s not about who has the biggest Christmas tree or the most stylish set of ornaments in the neighborhood – the best holiday décor is the one with a personality.

Involve the whole family in decorating. Let the kids help. Let them do a holiday-themed artwork, like paper snowflakes, painted cards, and DIY ornaments, and let the kids hang them. Incorporate Christmas cards and gifts into your décor. Don’t forget to play your favorite holiday music for the entire experience.  These simple touches inject character in your holiday décor.

Author Bio: Mina Corpuz is a daytime writer for PAAL Kit Homes, a renowned construction company that specializes in manufacturing and supplying top-quality steel-framed kit homes in Australia. She loves writing articles focused in real estate and interior design.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *